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Thread: Creating Shaded Relief like the professionals (Phothsop or Gimp)

  1. #1
    Guild Adept Turambar's Avatar
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    Default Creating Shaded Relief like the professionals (Phothsop or Gimp)

    I put together a short document based on one of my favorite video tutorials on how to create Shaded Relief easily in Photoshop or Gimp. I did this mostly for myself, since I find it difficult to reference video tutorials, but wanted to share in case others find it useful. The original video tutorial is also amazing and can be found here.

    Edit, for some strange reason it will not let me upload any file except PNG files at the moment, so here's a link to the PDF:[URL="https://drive.google.com/file/d/1O150pv__xsyV5NDGL3BxVI1KjGyusKZW/view?usp=sharing[/URL]
    Last edited by Turambar; 02-18-2024 at 12:53 PM.

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    Administrator waldronate's Avatar
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    That link seems to be broken.

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    Guild Adept Turambar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waldronate View Post
    That link seems to be broken.
    Thanks for the flag. Should be fixed now!

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    Administrator waldronate's Avatar
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    Because I'm too lazy to actually try this, how does this technique compare with using a single multiply blend mode for the grayscale modifier on the color?

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    Guild Adept Turambar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waldronate View Post
    Because I'm too lazy to actually try this, how does this technique compare with using a single multiply blend mode for the grayscale modifier on the color?
    Using a single Multiply ends up darkening the overall colors too much. This method allows you to preserve the base colors while just darkening the shadows and lightening the highlights. If you watch the video, it shows both methods. Multiply works for a fast and dirty shaded relief, but this method allows for a lot more control.

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    Guild Expert Facebook Connected XCali's Avatar
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    Shouldn't having a separate overlay and multiply solve the the color change?

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    Professional Artist Naima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turambar View Post
    Using a single Multiply ends up darkening the overall colors too much. This method allows you to preserve the base colors while just darkening the shadows and lightening the highlights. If you watch the video, it shows both methods. Multiply works for a fast and dirty shaded relief, but this method allows for a lot more control.
    I will take a try , usually I use several layers combinations using different blendings according to what I want to exhalt and in combination with masks, but I will have to try your approach to , thankyou for sharing.

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    Guild Adept Turambar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by XCali View Post
    Shouldn't having a separate overlay and multiply solve the the color change?
    This approach ensures that the highlight layer only lightens the bright areas and the shadow layer only darkens the shadows, thus leaving the base colors in other areas unaffected. It allows for a cleaner look, though it takes a couple extra steps.

    Quote Originally Posted by Naima View Post
    I will take a try , usually I use several layers combinations using different blendings according to what I want to exhalt and in combination with masks, but I will have to try your approach to , thankyou for sharing.
    Would love to see what you come up with. Though it is not really my approach, as I just wrote down the steps form the video. It is the approach used by Tom Patterson and other professional cartographers at the US National Park Service and USGS.

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